Post Topic

In the Press

Say Goodbye to Pandemic Rental Deals

For most of the pandemic, we saw house prices rise and urban rents fall as city dwellers traded the apartment for a single-family home. Rents dropped as much as 25% in some cities, but the days of apartment steals have come to an end. Rental site, Apartment List, reports that the median apartment rent rose…

Read More...

The Case for the Four Day Workweek

Americans have historically prided themselves on how much they work, treating burnout and exhaustion as a badge of honor, but employees and employers alike are beginning to see the mental and physical toll long hours take on an individual. The disruption to office life, brought on by Covid, has many companies, legislators, and employers rethinking…

Read More...

Most Popular Home Improvement Projects Amid COVID

Stuck at home, homeowners are displeased with their surroundings and funneling money they would have normally spent elsewhere into their homes. Over the past year, home improvement projects have surged and are showing no sign of slowing down. According to a survey from Axiom, a Minnesota-based marketing firm, 90 percent of 1,000 surveyed homeowners are…

Read More...

​​Insurers Focus on Increased Need for Inspections, Repairs for Older Buildings Amid the Surfside Condo Collapse

On June 24, part of the Champlain Towers South in Surfside, Florida, collapsed in the wee hours while many residents slept. To date, 97 residents have been confirmed dead. The catastrophic loss has sent shockwaves throughout this oceanfront community located in Miami-Dade County.

Read More...

Can Employers Force Workers to Get Vaccinated?

Whether or not employers can require workers to get inoculated against COVID-19 in order to return to the office or stay on the job is a rather complicated issue. According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), employers are legally allowed to require their workers to get a COVID-19 shot, with some exceptions. For example,…

Read More...

Workers Expecting More Flexibility As Offices Reopen

The country is opening up as more people get inoculated against the COVID-19 virus and cases continue to decrease. Indoor dining is back, the sports fields are dotted with players and the stands are filled with fans, people are traveling, and offices are starting to reopen. Many companies if they don’t already have some of…

Read More...

Insurers Remain Wary of Cryptocurrency

Cryptocurrency, a form of currency that is entirely digital, has taken the world by storm this past year. In April, Bitcoin surged to an all-time high of $63,000. Its price has more than quadrupled since 2020 and is up more than 60% since the start of 2021 — driven in part by Fortune 500 companies,…

Read More...

Inside the SPAC Frenzy

It seems like every time you turn around there is another SPAC announcement making headline news. A SPAC – “special purpose acquisition company” – is a shell corporation listed on a stock exchange with the intent of buying a private business and taking it public. It’s a way of doing an initial public offering (IPO)…

Read More...

FEMA Reforms Flood Insurance Program, Rates to Rise

For years, federal flood maps have underestimated flood risk across the United States. First Street Foundation publicly released flood risk data for over 142 million homes and properties across the country and found 14.6 million properties within Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHAs) unaccounted for by FEMA. FEMA’s maps are what inform risk management decisions in the United…

Read More...

What You Need to Know About Vaccine Passports

President Joe Biden recently announced that 90 percent of American adults will be eligible to receive their coronavirus vaccine by Mid-April, with all adults vaccine eligible no later than May 1st.  As more and more people get vaccinated against the coronavirus, many are wondering how to prove inoculation and whether or not that is necessary…

Read More...